• List of Articles  

      • Open Access Article

        1 - The Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) on Working Memory in Healthy Young Adults
        Nima ganji Roza Rashedi نگار کریمی پروانه  فرهاد بیگی Ali Akbar Soleimani Azam Noferesti Mohammad Hossein  Abdollahi Fatemeh Moin Al-Ghorabaei
        Introduction: Working memory is one of the fundamental cognitive ability that helps us perform complex mental processes but has limited capacity. Scientists are looking for ways to increase working memory capacity. Numerous studies have shown the effect of direct transc Full Text
        Introduction: Working memory is one of the fundamental cognitive ability that helps us perform complex mental processes but has limited capacity. Scientists are looking for ways to increase working memory capacity. Numerous studies have shown the effect of direct transcranial stimulation (tDCS) on various aspects of performance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of transcranial direct current stimulation on working memory function in healthy individuals. Methods: In this study, the effect of three-session of anodal tDCS stimulation period with an intensity of 2 mA in the lateral posterior anterior cortex on the working memory function of healthy individuals in two experimental and control random groups was investigated using N-Beck test. Results: The results showed that the subjects in the experimental group after three sessions of direct transcranial stimulation, presented a higher number of correct answers (p= 0.00) in less response time (p=0.00) in n-back task compare to their performance before the tDCS sessions. Subjects didn’t show significant difference through the same analysis which was performed in the control group. Conclusion: According to the n-back task results, before and after tDCS 3-session intervention, anodal transcranial stimulation on dorsal-lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) improves the performance of healthy subjects in the experimental group and tDCS neuromodulation could be an alternative way to improve cognition abilities like working memory among of healthy people. Manuscript Document
      • Open Access Article

        2 - Cognitive Reflection and the Coronavirus Conspiracy Beliefs
        Hashem Sadeghiyeh Iman Khanahmadi پروانه  فرهاد بیگی نگار کریمی Nima ganji
        Introduction: The COVID-19 pandemic reminded us of how quickly conspiracy ideas can spread and how dire their consequences could be. One important question is what traits would predict susceptibility to conspiracy beliefs. Previous research pointed to one of those trait Full Text
        Introduction: The COVID-19 pandemic reminded us of how quickly conspiracy ideas can spread and how dire their consequences could be. One important question is what traits would predict susceptibility to conspiracy beliefs. Previous research pointed to one of those traits: reflective versus intuitive cognitive style. Method: Here we examined how cognitive style correlates with founded and unfounded beliefs about the origin of COVID-19. A sample of 173 Iranians rated the likelihood of different beliefs about the origin of the new coronavirus and answered the original Cognitive Reflection Test. Results: In line with previous research, the reflective responses were negatively correlated with conspiracy beliefs and positively correlated with the founded statement (that the virus was spread from wild animals by chance). The reverse pattern was found for the intuitive responses. Conclusion: The results accrue more evidence in support of a relationship between reflective-analytic style of thinking and the tendency to reject conspiracy beliefs. Manuscript Document